Find us on Google+ Inventor Tales

Friday, September 23, 2016

A Little Glitch in the (A360) Matrix

Sometimes, the internet hiccups. And I found that happened with my Autodesk A360 account earlier this week.


This is *not* a glitch in the matrix.
I have three black cats.
Friday, I was going to log into my A360 account, and all I saw was the login screen.

Seeing how this is a normal thing to see, I logged in, and waited for A360 to do some technical things.

This before login is normal.


I wait excitedly to be greeted by the wealth of my accumulated information, and what do I see instead?

Seeing this after login is NOT normal!


That's right!  I loop back to the login screen!  It's about 10:30PM.  So I give up and go to bed.  Maybe the next day will fix it.

I try it again on the following day, and I still get the same thing.  It's time to ask Google!

And Google yielded some results from the Autodesk Community itself.  

You can read the thread at the link here, and I encourage you to do so!  

But here is the summary from that page.

The solution!
I tried it, and that solved it!

I was running Google Chrome, to clear your browser history in that program, hit CNTL+H, and choose the Clear Browsing Data button.




Then shut down your browser, and restart it.  Try logging in again, and the problem should be solved.

So if you're running into this issue, give this solution a try!

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

A Fusion 360 - Quick Tip on Showing Modeled Threads

It's sizing up to be a hectic week, but here's a really quick tip I discovered while creating some aircraft fluid fittings in Fusion 360.

A typical 37 degree flared fitting.

Did you know that while creating, or editing threads, you can change whether the thread representation is shown as a graphical representation, or as a modeled thread?

And you can toggle it off at will!

Showing the modeled thread location.  Right click (1), and check (2)!

Check it out, and give it a try!  When rendering models, this can make the difference between an average rendering, or a great one!

When you rendering without the threads displayed....

Not a bad rendering, but something is wrong.....
But now if you check that one simple box....

Now that's a big difference! 

Keep it in mind for a time that you need it!

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Two New Members, and Maintenance on "Websites Jon Likes"

A few years ago, I added a tab to InventorTales I named "Websites Jon Likes".

It contained resources I found helpful, or just a little interesting, and I just wanted to share them.

That page was long overdue for some maintenance, and so I finally cleaned it up.

I removed a few links that have gone dead.  The sites have now become the ghost of webpages past.

But two more sites were added, and for all the value I think they bring, I wish them a long and prosperous existence.

Here they are!

AIRCORPS Library   



An example of what you can find on AIRCORPS Library

The owners of this site have diligently collected and scanned prints and technical documents for aircraft form the 1930s, 1940s, and a few in the 1950s.  I grant you, they're a pay site, but in my opinion, they have earned every cent they earned, plus more.

Most of us live life in the cloud, and this has got to be one of the greatest uses for it I have seen.

If you like old airplanes or vintage technical documents, then this page is for you!

Lazze Metal Shaping

This is a great YouTube channel with a video after video of detailed sheet metal work.   Most of the work uses manual tools like English Wheels, shrinkers, stretchers, and brakes.

Definitely old school, and definitely worth your time!

Here's a video I liked, but this is just a small sample!  Check out the site on Youtube!



So take look a these sites!  I think you can find something worth while!

Sunday, September 11, 2016

Constraining Content Center Components in Autodesk Inventor - An Alternate Way

Recently, I've been doing a lot of work with content center lately.  I've been building content, publishing content, and fixing content.

It can be tedious, but it can also be a lot of fun.

But there's one trick I've picked up in my travels.  It's how to constrain content, in particular custom content, a little more quickly than by using the standard method.

Now before I get started, one disclaimer.  I'm using standard content to demo my blog, I didn't have customer content center fasteners I could share with you, so I had to borrow the standard.

Since I'm using standard content, I also I know I could use Autodrop, but the point was to show an alternative.  All I ask is you bear with me on the standard content part.

So with that said, it's time to get started.

Of course you'll need to place your content from the browser.

Selecting content to place

2) When the fastener previews, right click and choose the size you want to place.

Choosing the size of your content center fastener

3) Next left click to place your fastener, but here's the trick.  Without you even knowing it, the insert constrain is active.  Before you left click to place the next fastener, left click under the head of the fastener you wan to place.

Selecting under the head of the fastener
4) Now select the mating hole, the insert constraint will be created!

Completing the constraint with a second click on the mating hole
5) All that's left is to repeat the steps if you have multiple fasteners!  You don't have to exit the command!

Repeating the step for multiple fasteners. 
So give it a try if you have content you're using, particularly custom content.  I've found it helps me out, I hope it does the same for you!