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Friday, January 23, 2015

Shimming Your Knowledge- Changing Dimension Display in Autodesk Inventor.

SHIM (noun) - A thin piece of material, sometimes tapered, used for alignment or support.

I hectic schedule has required I take a different approach to my videos.

Instead of longer videos, which of course take more time to create, I'm going to create something shorter.  Originally I was going to call them "Microtips", but a friend suggested "Shims" as in the shims used in manufacturing.

But instead of using a these shims to adjust components for proper fir, you're shimming your knowledge for more productivity!

Now, let's use a this tip as a shim to adjust your knowledge for a better fit!

To start this out, here's one from the Inventor status bar, which is visible when a sketch is active, there are several buttons listed there, but for this tip, I'm just going to focus on the dimension display icon.

The dimension display menu expanded at the Status Bar
This icon changes how dimensions are displayed on your sketch, each providing you different information.

The options shown are as follows

1) Value - This option is the default for Inventor.  It shows the numerical value of the dimension, using the number of decimal places as set in the file's Document Settings.

Dimensions shown as value

2) Name - The Name options shows the name of the name of the dimension.  Notice that if a parameter is renamed, then that name is shown, instead of Inventor's default "dx" format.

Dimensions shown as name
3) Expression - This option displays both the dimension name, and the value at the same time.  If dimensions are linked to create mathematical expressions, these will be shown.

It also removes trailing zeros from a dimension, as well as showing additional decimal places for a dimension if it contains more than set in the Document Settings.

Dimensions shown as Expressions


4) Tolerance- If you've applied tolerances to a dimension, this setting will display the tolerances on screen. Additionally, any time a tolerance is evaluated at a value other than nominal, it will be underlined.  This is true of any dimension display setting.

For more on using tolerances in Inventor, see my earlier post!

Dimensions shown with Tolerances


5) Precise Value - This option removes trailing zeros from a dimension and showing the full decimal for a dimension if it exceeds the Document Settings.  It also shows the value of a toleranced dimension, even if it's being evaluated at a dimension other than nominal.

Dimensions showing Precise Value


And that's all for a short tip on Dimension Display!  I wanted to create something short and sweet.  I hope this helps!

I'm thinking of continuing to do this with the "little things" that are always a little hidden in Inventor.  If you think that's a good idea, throw in a comment below!

And a final note!  Here's a video describing the steps above!

Thursday, January 22, 2015

How to Attach Content Center to Vault 2015 through the ADMS Console!


Recently, I found myself installing Content Center Libraries into Autodesk Vault 2015.  It was standard operating procedure; I've done it a dozen times.

One thing new to the 2015 version of Vault, is that the Content Center Libraries are downloaded from the link here, instead of being provided on the media or in explicitly in the download.

The installer even states that when you're select it from the Install Tools & Utilities screen. 



No Content Here!  But there is a link to download it.

If you follow the instructions in the readme file, the steps aren't too difficult.  Just download the libraries you want, extract them, click on the batch file, and wait for the libraries to install. 
And if that’s how you wish to install the Content Center Libraries, go right ahead.   It works nicely!

Compressed Content Center on the left.
Extracted and ready to go on the right! 

But if you desire, there is an alternative way as well, if you prefer.

Start out by extracting the files down to the point where you can see the libraries in question, they end in the *.mdf and *.ldf extensions.  For example.  AI2015_Inventor ANSI.mdf, and AI2015_Inventor ANSI_log.ldf if you’re using the ANSI standard.

The ANSI libraries extracted.

Take these files, and copy them into the location with the other libraries for Vault, this location can vary, as an example, the location on my own machine is. D:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL11.AUTODESKVAULT\MSSQL\DATA.

In my example here, I've copied the ANSI, ISO, and Feature libraries.  But you can copy as many or as few as you want. 

The libraries copied into the Vault library locations

This will make the files available Vault, but Vault does need to be told to use them.
In order to tell Vault that it’s going to be using these files, open the ADMS Console, locate the Library folder. 

 Once you have that, right click on the folder and choose Attach.

Attaching the libraries you want. 
The libraries that have been placed directory appear, and you can add them to Vault by selcting them and clicking OK. 

You'll have to choose each individually, but this only takes a few minutes for a big library, or just a few seconds for a small library. 


You can add as many, or as few libraries as you need. I'd suggest skipping any libraries you don't want.

The libraries are loaded. 
There it is! An alternate way of loading the Content Center Libraries into Vault. 

But that does beg the question "So what?".  Why would you load the libraries using the alternate way, instead of the other way? 

The truth is, you can use whichever way you want.  It matters little in the grand scheme of things.

But if you've already have the extracted libraries, or you don't have the handy dandy batch file available, this can be a quick way to get where you need to be. 

I've even seen some clever Vault Admins use the Detach option as a way of "deleting without commitment" . They detach the library and make it unavailable to Vault, so users don't have access to it.

If at some point it turns out the users *do* need it, they just reattach it, without having to go through the process of downloading and extracting. 

So keep it in mind as just another tool you can use to make your life a little easier. . 

Sunday, January 11, 2015

An Exercise in iParts, and a Little Bit of Sharing!


Over the course of the last couple of weeks, I've been working on a little project, and I thought I'd share..

The part I practiced on was a NAS fastener series 1141-1148, in grip lengths from 1/16 of an inch to 6 inches. I built it with the intention of being usable as a library part, not to be one hundred percent accurate.

Since the part is a screw, with the same shape used in several different sizes, I decided to make it as an iPart.

The reason I created it was to refresh my memory when working with iParts, as well as exercise my knowledge of aircraft standards a bit. And it was good practice!

While I didn't learn (or relearn) anything particularly earth shattering, there are a couple of tips that I thought might be worth sharing.

1) Don't forget that you can use Microsoft Excel to edit your part tables.  Using Excel will allow you to using Excel to create equations, or just fill and copy series in the table.

Using Excel can make editing the table *much* easier!

For example, looking at the sample part number 1145-03, the 03 means something.  It's the grip length of the screw in 16ths of an inch.  so 03/16 = a grip length of 3/16.

Looking at that from Excel, you have a formula!  Hello automating a repetitive task!

An example of an equation calculating a screw's grip length.

2) Don't forget that you can use Edit Member Scope and Edit Factory Scope to make adjusting iParts a little easier.

Edit Member Scope means any changes you make to the model only affect the active member.

Edit Factory Scope changed the entire factory, for example, when I need to add a fillet to the whole factory, I edited the factory scope.  When I wanted to modify just the width of a torq head (the sort of Phillips head looking part) for a single variation, I edited the member scope.

The icon for editing member versus factory scope.
3) If you want to generate all the iPart members in a hurry, select them using Shift+Left Click.  Once the parts are selected, right click and choose Generate Files.

The computer may chug a bit, but it will build all the members required for this part.  Saving the trouble of doing it later.

Selecting all all the members and generating all the files to generate all the files.
But after I was done working on this project, I decided that I would go head and share more than a few tips for this part, I'm just going to go ahead and share the iPart.

Of course I do have to offer up a few disclaimers, or at least advisories.

1) I've done my best to make sure that the values are correct.  But there is always the possibility that I suffered a case of fat fingers.  It never hurts to verify if you're going to use it for real!

2) This screw actually uses UNJF threads, not UNF like I've used in the iPart.  However, I designed this with the intention to be placed in assemblies, not to be accurate to the manufacturing level.  Since the default Inventor Thread table doesn't contain UNJF threads by default.

I do have a modified Thread.xls file with UNJ threads in it, but rather than talk people through modifying their Design Data folders, I decided to keep the part as universal as possible, since ultimately the part is only intended to be placed in an assembly.

But with all that said, take the part, use it, and enjoy it by downloading it from my GrabCAD account here!

If you don't have a GrabCAD account, you can download it from this link!

One final note, I found the technical information for the screw at the Coast Fabrication website.  It's got a wealth of information!






Wednesday, January 07, 2015

The Vault Service is Alive and Well! Why Can't I find the Data Management Services?!?!


Not that long ago, I ran into a Vault issue that I can only describe as truly puzzling, and more than a bit nerve wracking.

It all started out with the phrase that will strike fear into the heart of any Vault Admin.

"Vault's down.  Engineering is at a standstill." 

In Vault world, this is the same as hearing "Shields are down, weapons offline, and the dilithium crystals are nearly dead."

If you haven't heard this phrase, you're lucky.  If you have, trust me, it'll make you want to grab a red shirt and join the away team.

Left with no choice, I plunged in.  With Vault off line, many scenarios become a possibility, most of them not good.

After all, there's nothing more dangerous than engineers with free time.  It's like the A-Team, MacGyver and the MythBusters merged Voltron style, and then downed a gallon of espresso before going to work

The error being displayed by every single client was.




I reset IIS, the IT Admin rebooted the computer.  The same error appeared.  


I checked the standard issue things.

  • IIS?                           Running like a top
  • SQL Server?             Serving SQL just fine. 
  • Firewalls?                 Allowing traffic to pass. 
  • Log files?                  Nothing out of the norm... so it seemed....


Meanwhile, engineering has accepted a dare to use old office supplies, stale chocolate, and a 63 VW Beetle chassis to create an upgraded version of Rock 'em Sock 'em Robots.

Finally, after a bit of searching, the solution presented itself in the form of the link on the Autodesk support site here

A document came up, the first thing it said was check for the following in the Vault logs.  You'll commonly hear them called "Vlogs", and can be found using the instructions at this link.

Error: Soap Exception ( mesg-id = 635298001452597277 ) 
Exception: WebServiceError [800]
 
Exception(Inner): There was no endpoint listening at https://avia-srv3/AutodeskDM/Services/_impl/SiteService.svc that could accept the message. This is often caused by an incorrect address or SOAP action. See InnerException, if present, for more details. 
Stacktrace(Inner): 

Apparently, for reasons unknown, there was an SSL error that was preventing the connection to Vault.  I don't know all the ones and zeros that would cause this, and now with engineering trying to attach flamethrowers to their super-sized boxing game, we were focused on fixing the issue.

I try the first steps in the solution, which are:
  1. Start the Autodesk Data Management Server Console (ADMS) and go to Menu tools > Global Settings > Advanced Settings > Email.
  2. Remove the selection from the "Enable Compatibility with SSL" option.
But that doesn't solve my issue.  When I try to go to the Tools pulldown, I get the following error.


Fortunately, the solution at the link contains instructions for that case too!
  1. Use Notepad to open the web.config file from C:\Program Files\Autodesk\ADMS Professional 2014\Server\Web\Services .
  2. Change the sslRequired key from "true" to "false." 
I run these solutions, and for good measure, type IISRESET at the windows command prompt to bounce the service.

Now, both the IT admin and I hold our breaths and cross our fingers.

And then.....

It works! 

The first user logs in, then the second, and so on!  Cue epic symphonic music!

The IT admin and I congratulate each other.  If we had been in the same room, instead of working remotely, we might have hugged.

It felt like we had just successfully disarmed a bomb! 

But in the end, what's the point?  Why am I sharing this?  Will another user out in there find this helpful?

I don't know, you may never encounter this error.  And I'm the first to hope you don't.

But if this little tip resurrects just one users' Vault minutes before engineering completes their time traveling DeLorean.  If one user is able to take this and say "I was able to minimize downtime...."

If one frazzled CAD manager is just a little less frazzled, then this post did it's job!