Find us on Google+ Lessons From Life's Workbench - Intergranular Corrosion ~ Inventor Tales

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Lessons From Life's Workbench - Intergranular Corrosion

One of the most insidious types of corrosion I learned about in my classes is intergranular corrosion.  Aluminum alloys containing copper, such as 2024 aluminum, particularly if it's been improperly heat treated.  

The copper in the alloy comes out of the solution, and creates tiny galvanic cells that begin corroding the metal. 

The sneaky part of this type of corrosion is that it can happen deep inside the material, and may not become visible until the corrosion breaks the surface of the material in a process called exfoliation. 

Here are some pictures of aluminum that has some serious exfoliation.
The metal has completely disintegrated.
Another angle of the same extrusion.
You can see how the material has flaked away.
It goes without saying that intergranular corrosion is bad.  But if it can start in the interior of a material, where it can't be seen,, how can it be found?

That's where nondestructive tests (NDT) such as ultrasonic inspection or eddy current inspection can be employed to locate and eliminate this type of corrosion before it affects the strength of the structure. 

That's it for this weeks tip!  Have a great week! 


No comments:

Post a Comment